20,000 Leaks - X-Box Kinect

Resources

Xbox Kinect
Interactive whiteboard
SMART Notebook Activities
Kinect Adventures
Gaming mat
Chosen parallel play activities
Barrier games
Turn sequence board
Two player participation board

 

Syllabus Outcomes
Outcomes

Early Stage 1 Outcomes

INES1.3 Relates well to others in work and play situations.

Life Skills 7-10 Outcomes

LS.6 Recognises factors that affect personal relationships.

HSC Life Skills 11-12 Outcomes

3.3 demonstrates communication skills when relating to others

Indicators

  • Participate alongside a peer during an activity. 
  • Sharing/Taking turns with peers.
  • Working cooperatively with a peer to complete an activity.

  • Communicating with a partner to complete an activity.

 

Game Description

 

In 20,000 Leaks, the player's avatar is in a glass cube underwater. The player/s positions his or her limbs and head to plug cracks as crabs, fish, sharks and swordfish cause cracks and holes in the cube. As difficulty increases, up to five leaks must be plugged at a time to earn Adventure Pins. Each game consists of three waves, which end when time expires or when all leaks are plugged. Extra time left over at the end of each wave is added to the Adventure Pin total.

 

Introduction:

1. Participate alongside a peer during an activity: To assist students in becoming comfortable with woking alongside a peer provide opportunities for students to participate in parallel play with their peers in a shared space. This can include: playing in a sandpit, water play activities, construction activities and drawing activities on a whiteboard that is divided into 2 equal sections. Discuss and demonstrate what personal space and shared spaces look like. Here you could use a hula hoop to highlight a student’s personal space. You may choose to discuss those people who are allowed into your personal space. This section may be incorporated into your schools behaviour program e.g. Positive Behaviour Learning.

 

2. Sharing/Taking turns with peers: Provide examples of activities where sharing and taking turns is essential e.g. playing cards / board games. Provide opportunities for students to participate in these activities. Discuss the importance of equal distribution of turns / time / space / objects. Provide opportunities for students to take turns in a single player game with their peers progressing to multiple player games. This sharing may be supported by a visual cue e.g. a turn-sequence board.

 

3. Working cooperatively with a peer to complete an activity: Note: You may choose to focus on this teaching intention once students are happy to participate alongside a peer during an activity and will freely share and take turns with a peer. Prior to playing ‘20,000 Leaks’ demonstrate to students the benefits of working cooperatively together to complete an activity by providing examples of how working collaboratively has had positive effects or made jobs / tasks much easier (e.g. See Lego video). When playing ‘20,000 Leaks’ model the strategies that are effective for working cooperatively throughout the game. Initially, it may be beneficial to work alongside the student to demonstrate effective cooperation with a partner when participating in the activity (allow the students the opportunity to work together later in the lesson). To further facilitate this teaching, provide students with additional activities that promote working together e.g. creating a floor puzzle, making group artwork and cooking as a group.

 

4. Communicating with a partner to complete an activity: Note: Again you may choose to focus on this teaching intention once students are happy to participate alongside a peer during an activity and will freely share and take turns with a peer. Provide opportunities for students to engage in activities that require partners to communicate with one another. Barrier games are a great way of developing communication skills as they require a communicator and a listener. Talking Matters Australia has a range of barrier game resources. These will need to be supported through AAC for non-verbal students (see http://www.talkingmatters.com.au/resources/downloads/cat_view/2-barrier-games). Once students have had the opportunity to take part in a range of barrier games move onto ‘20,000 Leaks’. Model how you could communicate with a partner while playing the game e.g “You fix that leak on your side”, “I will fix the leak on my side” and “Use your foot to fix that leak”. Teacher initially works alongside the student to demonstrate effective communication to participate in the activity. For non-verbal students develop a range of PCS to accompany the game that will assist students to effectively communicate with a peer when working together. These can also be used to support speech. 

 

Exploration: Note: Throughout this phase of the lesson video students playing alongside one another.

 

1. Participate alongside a peer during an activity: Start by demonstrating to students what is expected when two people are playing alongside one another. Do this by playing the game with another student. Allow students the opportunity to participate in the activity with a peer. Support with visual cues e.g. a two player participation board. Mark out a gaming area on the floor (with masking tape). Divide the gaming area into 2 equal sections. You may choose to place a photo of the student within their section of the gaming area. Some students may like to dominate the game and frequently move into the other student’s gaming area. Encourage students to stay within their section of the gaming area.

 

2. Sharing/Taking turns with peers: Start by indicating when each student will have their turn on the turn-sequence board. Use the ‘now’ and ‘finished’ symbols to indicate whose turn it currently is and whose turn has finished respectively. Rotate the order in which students have their turn. Allow students the opportunity to participate in the activity with a peer. Explicitly focus on each student sharing the responsibilities and tasks associated with the game. Support with visual cues e.g. playing space outlined in equal parts on the floor and student photos allocated to a space.

 

3. Working cooperatively with a peer to complete an activity: Allow students the opportunity to participate in the activity with a peer focusing on working cooperatively without the visual cues. Encourage students to work with a variety of partners. Discuss and demonstrate the benefits of playing ‘20,000 Leaks’ with a partner as opposed to single player. Ask students if it is easier to complete the activity with a partner. Record the score achieved with cooperative play compared to single play.

 

4. Communicating with a partner to complete an activity: Allow students the opportunity to participate in the activity with a peer. Focus on communicating with a partner through speech, gestures, body language or PCS to successfully complete the game. Reinforce through modelling the use of verbal and gestural/body language which can be used by students when they are working cooperatively e.g. “jump now”, “1, 2, 3 jump” and pointing (to indicate where you would like a partner to move to). Praise communication between students.

 

Conclusion:

 

1. Participate alongside a peer during an activity / Sharing/Taking turns with a Partner / Working cooperatively with a peer to complete an activity / Communicating with a partner to complete an activity: Display videos of students playing alongside one another. Praise students for appropriate play with a peer. Highlight those students who are sharing responsibilities/tasks within the game. Praise those students who are waiting for their turn while others are playing. Provide opportunities for students to discuss the benefits of working together when playing games as opposed to playing on their own. Ask questions that focus on the need to communicate and cooperate e.g. “What happened when you didn’t move together?”, “What happened if only one person blocked the leaks?”  

 

Assessment


The student will: Participate alongside a peer during an activity.

 

Indicators: 

  • Attend to activity standing beside a teacher
  • Attend to activity standing beside a peer
  • Freely participate alongside a peer for the duration of the activity

 

The student will: Sharing/Taking turns with a peer.

 

Indicators:

  • Wait for their turn as indicate by turn-sequence board
  • Stay within own gaming area while playing with a peer

 

The student will:  Work cooperatively with a peer to complete an activity. 


Indicators:

  • Share responsibilities/tasks fairly with a peer
  • Solve problems with a peer to complete an activity

 

The student will: Communicate with a partner to complete an activity.

 

Indicators: 

  • Attempts to gain peers attention
  • Initiates communication with a peer while completing an activity
  • Use simple speech/gestures/PCS to communicate during an activity
  • Responds to directions/instructions given by a partner

 

Extension Activities / Additional Games

Any game that supports side-by-side cooperative play can be used to support teaching intentions from this lesson. Several teaching intentions from this lesson can be incorporated into schools/classes behaviour program.